Archive for August, 2017

Kinglet

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

51BI6K3Dn-LBy Donna Migliaccio

The Short Take:

This fresh and fast-moving epic fantasy was a delight to read — a brave yet conflicted hero, not too many fighting sequences, a dollop of romance, a different take on magic, and a wealth of engaging characters. It’s all good.

Why?

I admit epic fantasy is one of my preferred genres, though I can count on one hand the number of multiple book series I have read. I want to be sure the characters and story are worth the time invested.

This one grabbed me with its first line: “The soldiers were shimmering again.” That would be due to one of the two types of magic in this book — something you don’t often come by in fantasy. In fact, there were a number of fresh takes on the genre in this volume; like a tough woman who’s not afraid to mix things up, and that power-mad magician. It’s a fun read.

By the way, I’ve been burned by book series where the wait between volumes is ridiculous (looking at you, Martin and Rothfuss). So I contacted this author to be sure there were other books coming down the pipeline — she’s already finished book four. Good.

A Little Plot:

Kristan is son and heir to The Gemeta, king of Fandrall. But a powerful and vengeful magician overthrows his father and takes his kingdom. Escaping to the wilderness of the Exilwald, Kristan finds unlikely allies who help him hide, but he cannot stay hidden forever. Two many forces are aligned against him.

For more about Migliaccio (who is also an actress, it appears), click here.

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore

Monday, August 21st, 2017

UnknownBy Matthew Sullivan

The Short Take:

This was a quick read, but also a bit of a head scratcher. It’s supposed to be a murder mystery yet the plot is almost completely driven by a suicide. Huh?

Why?

There’s a lot of misdirection in this mystery. The plot ambles along at a gentle pace, making you think something is going to happen over and over. But it doesn’t. It’s many pages before the actual murder is even mentioned, and then it turns out it’s 20 years in the past.

Relations past and present seem to be abandoned or begun for no real reason, there are some far-fetched coincidences, and it’s actually pretty easy to guess whodunit once the murder is actually presented.

I wasn’t unhappy while reading this book, but when I finished it  my reaction was, “What?” That’s not so great.

A Little Plot:

Lydia’s favorite customer commits suicide in the bookstore. She inherits his meager belongings and searches for clues to his action. She’s also avoiding her father and everyone else from her past, all due to a traumatic childhood incident and it’s aftermath.

For more about Matthew Sullivan click here.

The House of the Spirits

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

Unknown-1By Isabel Allende

The Short Take:

Magical realism meets with political oppression in this over 30-year-old novel — Allende’s first. I’ve long been a fan of hers, and this epic story following three generations of exceptional women — and one very powerful man — did not disappoint.

Why?

I did not know Allende was the niece of the Chilean Marxist President Salvador Allende and that the political side of this novel was solidly founded on historical fact. Blame my scant knowledge of South American events for that, which researching for this review helped to remedy in some small fashion.

These political underpinnings start well in the novel’s background but eventually move to center stage as the book progresses. Above and beyond that, one amazing woman after another shapes and reshapes the lives of those around them, through powers both domestic and supernatural. It’s their stories that keep you engaged and keep you reading.

While most of the book is written in third person, the violent man who impacts all their lives, Esteban Trueba, speaks to you directly, though his actions sometimes give the lie to his words.

A hound as big as a horse, levitation, fantastical creche figures, fortune telling, and other peculiarities stride alongside growing political turmoil as the downtrodden begin to insist on their rights. Somehow Allende makes that combination seem realistic — it’s all fantastic.

A Little Plot:

Esteban labors at his a gold mine, desperate to earn the money to marry his adored Rosa. Her accidental death drives him to bury his sorrows with work on the decayed family farm. It also drives Rosa’s younger sister, Clara, to refuse to speak for nine years. Yet the future of these two will entwine.

For more about Allende, click here.

The Changeling

Friday, August 4th, 2017

UnknownBy Victor Lavalle

The Short Take:

This disturbing tale brings together the worst nightmares of a modern, over-protective father and monstrous horrors from the Brothers Grimm. While that sounds hard to swallow, Lavelle makes it go down rather smoothly.

Why?

Lavalle’s hero, Apollo, and his wife, Emma, are very real New Yorker African-Americans. It’s important to remember this, because after their baby arrives, their lives go completely bonkers.

There is probably no other book remotely like this one. It’s rich, surprising, complex, shocking, and very well written. It is not particularly easy to like but it’s also almost impossible to put down. The story sucks you in, delivers the ride of a lifetime, then makes you question the whole experience.

While the importance — and limitation — of fatherhood is the primary focus, the way racism shapes and restricts the characters’ actions also snaps you to attention. There’s a lot going on here — from legal issues and media exploitation to the loyalty of friends and folk tales come to life.

Lavelle went bold with this one. Very, very bold.

A Little Plot:

Apollo dreams of his absent father and vows that when his own child is born he will protect his son at all costs. However, the anxieties and exhaustion of parenthood are taking their toll, driving the two apart. Problems — and secrets — increase the stress even more. Then, something unbelievably horrific happens.

For more about Victor Lavalle and his work, click here.

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