After Alice

51+a-Uro0HL._SL75_By Gregory Maguire

The Short Take:

Both magical and meaningful, Maguire’s reworking of Carroll’s Alice books is enchanting. Ada falls down the rabbit hole and goes in search of her friend, Alice, encountering many of the same madcap characters but with more philosophical (and delightfully witty) exchanges.

Why?

Best known for the broadway musical based on his novel Wicked, Maguire is an expert at taking children’s tales and turning them into intriguing books for adults. After Alice is no exception.

Maguire loses none of the whimsy of his source material but artfully incorporates thoughts on being trapped — whether by the institution of slavery or a metal back brace, the afterlife, family, friendship, and the confusion of adolescence.

Small observations that send my mind spinning into wide orbits are followed by delicious wordplays. Silliness and symbolism go hand in hand. Even the vocabulary is exceptionally rich, as is appropriate for this Oxford setting in the Victorian Era.

Maguire and Carroll fans should both be more than pleased.

A LittlePlot:

Clumsy Ada manages to evade her governess to wander on her own outside. However, while hiding she slips down a rabbit hole not too long after Alice  (hence the title).

Meanwhile, Alice’s older sister, Lydia, must deal with the disappearance of both children, a distraught governess, a party of guests including Charles Darwin, and her own recent bereavement.

Characters from both Carroll books will be encountered, plus another child enters the picture.

While this book had a clear ending, I’m hopeful for a sequel. The seeds are there just waiting to grow.

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